Celebrating My New Blog: A Book Giveaway!

I’ve blogged over the years for a variety of organizations and colleagues. However, I’ve never committed to a full-time blog of my own. Lately, I’ve found myself tweeting an assortment of one liners that I’ve thought I should turn into full length blog posts. So, I decided to take the plunge! I’ve officially become a blogger and plan to blog at least once or twice a week.

To celebrate the launch of my blog, I’ve decided to giveaway two copies of my book, Authentic Learning Experiences: A Real-World Approach to PBL. To be eligible for the giveaway, simply leave me a comment, here, on why it is important to incorporate Authentic Learning Experiences in education today. If you would like an additional entry, let me know in the comments section that you tweeted out the giveaway opportunity! I will choose two winners, at random, from all comments received. Check back on Monday, April 14 for the announcement of the winners and a blog post that reviews the comments on authenticity.

I’d also love to connect with you via Twitter or LinkedIn. Expanding our personal learning communities is imperative for us to learn and grow.

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10 Comments

  1. PBL is an authentic approach to providing students with a real world project and audience that provides an outlet to notice, wonder, discover, and explore learning in unique ways. I have been involved in the initiative since the late 1990s and would welcome a chance to review this book.

  2. Teachers must create learning opportunities that matter to their kids. Authentic learning experiences, as I am beginning to appreciate more and more, bring content to life. Students are not sponges–they are our future decision makers. We, as educators, must resist the urge to spoon feed information to children and refrain from measuring student success by their ability to regurgitate basic factual information. Grappling with real life, authentic content gives our kids voices that would otherwise be silenced in traditional (outdated) modes of teaching and learning. Authentic learning, through PBL, constantly puts students at the helm of their own learning. As a result, they see how content knowledge can be applied to synthesize solutions to authentic problems. Authentic learning leads to citizens who can solve authentic problems. Our kids need more of this in their day-to-day learning environment!

  3. Authentic experiences are needed in order to promote an empowered approach to learning for all students. Too many students aren’t provided educational opportunities that go beyond text book memorization. It is imperative that education makes a shift away from mere activities and simulations and moves toward incorporating an inquiry approach that connects to the community and problems with which we are faced today.

  4. Authenticity in the classroom promotes student buy in, rather than a “just for a grade” attitude.

  5. We’re taking our most concentrated stab at authenticity with the installation of an open badging launch at our high school. Our first group through will be the learning strategies classes. Their badges will be centered in project-based learning: the neuroscience of learning badge that will help them design their own PBLs pitched to their individual learning preferences, a gratitude badge researching and augmenting the incidences of gratitude around them, and then a starter badge creating a modern fable. We want to equip these kids with digital backpacks they can take into life with them. We’ll be enjoying your blog and will retweet your efforts! Thanks!

  6. Authentic learning experiences are valuable for simple reasons we seem to over look as educators. These experiences allow for the growth of the tools students need to become successful adults in the work place. Traditional teaching models do not allow for these skills. We need to allow our students to practice these skills in school to fine tune them. School is a place that should allow for risk taking experiences. Allow students to fail. Allow students to reflect. Allow students to revise work.
    Our goal should be to prepare them for their future, wherever that may be. We are doing our students a disservice if we are not allowing them to practice these skills.

  7. Is there anything more important than providing authentic learning experiences for our students? I can’t think of many. This approach solves so many of the problems that persist in our schools today, including lack of differentiation, lack of meaningful technology integration, lack of student motivation, and our failure to address a wide variety of learning styles.

  8. To be an authentic educator I had to do a couple of things:

    Get off the Stage
    I found myself after several years of teaching being the sage, extolling all of the knowledge that I had assimilated down upon my students. I thought that my passion for my interests would engage them. Although I might intrigue them for a moment they were not truly engaged. So I began to guide them toward taking responsibility for their learning.

    Become the learner
    I needed to look at the kids that came into my room differently, so I stopped looking at them as students and started looking at them as learners. In doing so I was forced to re-evaluate my position as well. A teacher passes information but if I was going to turn responsibility over to them then my role as teacher needed to shift as well. How could I profess to be a life long learner if I called myself “Teacher-Master of all I Survey” Hence, my title became “lead learner” which I share with my learners whenever the lead each other in learning teams.

    This didn’t take place over night and every year a new group of learners walks into my room and begins the process again. Though hard work on all our parts, a lot of mistakes (mistakes are good), and learning each class grows more than they ever expect. And I am always amazed.

  9. To be an authentic educator I had to do a couple of things:

    Get off the Stage
    I found myself after several years of teaching being the sage, extolling all of the knowledge that I had assimilated down upon my students. I thought that my passion for my interests would engage them. Although I might intrigue them for a moment they were not truly engaged. So I began to guide them toward taking responsibility for their learning.

    Become the learner
    I needed to look at the kids that came into my room differently, so I stopped looking at them as students and started looking at them as learners. In doing so I was forced to re-evaluate my position as well. A teacher passes information but if I was going to turn responsibility over to them then my role as teacher needed to shift as well. How could I profess to be a life long learner if I called myself “Teacher-Master of all I Survey” Hence, my title became “lead learner” which I share with my learners whenever the lead each other in learning teams.

    This didn’t take place over night and every year a new group of learners walks into my room and begins the process again. Though hard work on all our parts, a lot of mistakes (mistakes are good), and learning each class grows more than they ever expect. And I am always amazed.

    I sent out the book givaway via twitter @FreemanRMS

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